Santa Fe Seniors on Bikes Blog
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Santa Fe Seniors on Bikes

Ride Slips for April 24th 2014

a Route slip

Santa Fe Loop
Ride Leader:  Steve Griego

start time: 9:30

Start    SFCC parking lot
L:  Campus Entrance  (Traffic Circle)
L:  Richards Ave.
R:  Ave Del Sur
R:  Rancho Viejo Blvd
L:  Cerrillos Rd/NM-14
R:  NM-599/Veterans Memorial hwy
L:  Airport Rd/Paseo Real
R:  Colony Dr.
R:  Paseo Del Rio/Frontage Rd.
R:  Camino La Tierra
Cross: Hwy 599
L: On Ramp to 599
R:    Off Ramp Ridgtop
L: North Ridgetop Rd.
R:    Tano Road
R:    Overpass Hwy 285
R:    Camino Encantado
L:    Bishop Lodge Road
R:    Barranca Road
R:    Piedra Arroyo
R:    Sierra del Norte
L:    Paseo del Sur
L:    Gonzales Road
R:    Hyde Park Road
L:    Gonzales Road
L:    E Alameda St.
R: Camino Cabra
L:  Camino Del Monte Sol
L:  Old Santa Fe Trail
R:  Two Trails Rd
R:  Old Las Vegas Hwy
L:  Old Pecos Trail
R: Rabbit Rd
L:  Willow Back Rd
L:  Richards Ave (traffic circle)
L:  Campus Entrance  SFCC
End:    SFCC parking lot

Total 44 miles

B Route slip

Rancho Viejo Loop
Ride Leader:  John Veillux

start time:  9:30

Start: SFCC parking lot
L:  Richards Ave.
R:  Aveneda Del Sur
R:  Rancho Viejo Blvd
R:  Dinosaur Trail
L:  Richards Ave.
R:  Governor Miles Road
L:  Camino Carlos Rey
R:  Arroyo Chamiso Trail
L:  Rail Trail
R:  San Mateo Road
Cross:  Old Pecos Hwy/Continue Camino Lejos
R:  Old Santa Fe Trail
R:  Old Gaucho Rd
R:  Old Las Vegas Highway
L:  Old Pecos Hwy
R:  Rabbit Road
L:  Oshara Village
L:  Richards (roundabout)
End:  SFCC parking lot

Total: 26 Miles

c Route slip

Rancho Viejo Loop
Ride Leader: Ramon Parcells

start time: 9:30

Start: SFCC parking lot
L:  Richards Ave.
R: Aveneda Del Sur
R: Rancho Viejo Blvd
R: Dinosaur Trail
L:  Richards Ave.
R: Governor Miles Road
L: Camino Carlos Rey
R: Arroyo Chamiso Trail
L: Rail Trail
R: San Mateo Road
R: Old Pecos Hwy
R: Rabbit Road
L: Oshara Village
L: Richards (roundabout)
End: SFCC parking lot

Total: 20 Miles

Official SOB jersey on sale now - from Edwin

Official SOB jersey on sale now

Official SOB jersey on sale now.

A BIG CHANGE - the SOB Logo will be on the front.  

The base color is yellow with red sleeves.  The side panels are turquoise with Seniors On Bikes written on them.  The bicycle with multicolored wheels will appear on the back and sleeves.  Castelli is the manufacturer and the cost is projected to be $60.00.

A word of caution: The sizing is small!  No orders will be accepted until you take your measurement and compare with the Castelli sizing chart. The chart is in centimeters so multiply by  2.54 to get the inch equivalent.  See chart below.


 No money necessary until you receive the merchandise.  There will be photos available in the next week or so.

If you are interested contact Edwin at: ecrosswhite@cybermesa.com.


Order for license plate jerseys - from Herb

 We are extending the order period for these jerseys to May 19. 

This is probably the last opportunity to purchase this jersey unless the SOB Board decides to reissue for the next license plate period of 2015------2016. This would give continuity to what has been a  successful design.                        

                                            Welcome to the Voler Online Ordering System
Your club has decided to use the Voler Custom Online Order System for collecting and processing your cycling apparel order for the updated license plate jerseys. Please follow the steps below to place your individual order for inclusion in the overall team order.

1. Click on this link to access your team order site: www.voler.com/custom/ordering/li/5357

2. Click on “LOGIN” to enter your Login/Billing Info. Click on “Create Account” to save the information and to create your new User ID and Password. You will automatically be directed to the home page for your team order. If you are a returning customer, please use your original Login and Password.

3. Click on “Begin Shopping" to gain access to the orderable products page. To place items in your shopping cart, click on the item you want to order, then the options you want to select, then the “Add to cart” button. You can choose to “View Your Bag” or “Continue Shopping” after adding each item. Repeat these steps for each item you want to order.

4. After placing the last item you want to order in your shopping cart, click on “View Your Bag” to display the items. Carefully review the items and make any necessary modifications or deletions. Because each item is custom built, refunds and exchanges will not be accepted. After you have confirmed your order is correct, click on “Proceed to Checkout” to complete the secure checkout process by entering your credit card payment information.

5. After you have completed the secure checkout process, an Order Confirmation will automatically be displayed and e-mailed to you for your records.

6. After the order deadline date has passed, you will no longer be able to access the order site. If you have not completed the checkout process for your order by this date, any items in your cart will be removed. The Order Deadline and the Order Ship Date are displayed on the order homepage. The Ship Date is the date that your order will be shipped from Voler.

Thank you for your order. If you have any questions, please call 800-488-6537 and ask for assistance from a Voler Customer Service Representative, or email Herb Schon at schonherb@comcast.net or phone him at 505 466-2955..

BTW: The copy over the mountain reads: Once you're over the hill...you begin to pick up speed. 


SOB route slips for 4/17/2014

a Route slip

Zia Loop
Ride Leader: Gary Katz
start time: 10:00 am

Start: Eldorado, Agora Center
L: Avenida Vista Grande
L: U.S. Hwy 285
R: Old Las Vegas Hwy
Regroup: Apache Canyon church
Return: Old Las Vegas Hwy.
L: Bobcat crossing road 
R: Apache Plume Dr.
R: Nine Mile Bridge Road
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
L: Seaton Village Road
R: Arroyo Hondo Road
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
R: Old Pecos Trail
R: Zia Road
R: Old Santa Fe Trail
Regroup: hill top before Canada Village
Turn around: Old Santa Fe Trail  (NW)
L: Two Trails Road
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
R: US Hwy 285
R: Avenida Vista Grande
End:  Agora Center in Eldorado

Total: 35 miles


B Route slip

Zia Loop w/coffee 
at Downtown Subscription
Ride Leader:  George Gamble

start time: 10:00 am

Start: Eldorado, Agora Center
L: Avenida Vista Grande
L: U.S. Hwy 285
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
L: Bobcat crossing road 
R: Apache Plume Dr.
R: Nine Mile Bridge Road
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
L: Seaton Village Road
R: Arroyo Hondo Road
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
R: Old Pecos Trail
R: Zia Road
L: Fort Union Dr.
L: Camono Corrales
L: Garcia
Regroup: Downtown Subscription
Return: Garcia
L: Old Santa Fe Trail
R: El Goncho Way
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
R: US Hwy 285
R: Avenida Vista Grande
End:  Agora Center in Eldorado

Total: 25 miles


c Route slip

Zia Loop w/coffee 
at Downtown Subscription
Ride Leaders: Jim Hallquist
Cell: 505-412-0573
start time: 10:00 am

Start: Eldorado, Agora Center
L: Avenida Vista Grande
L: U.S. Hwy 285
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy.
R: Old Pecos Trail
R: Zia Road
L: Fort Union Dr.
L: Camino Corrales
L: Garcia
Regroup: Downtown Subscription
Return: Garcia
L: Old Santa Fe Trail
R: El Goncho Way
L: Old Las Vegas Hwy
R: US Hwy 285
R: Avenida Vista Grande
End:  Agora Center in Eldorado

Total: 23 miles

SOB Ride Video Corrected - now viewable

Sorry for the confusion on the video.
This link works as a Public View: http://youtu.be/Pn7AbHAvDdE


Hope you enjoy.

Ian

Group Video from our last ride - from Ian

Hope you see yourself somewhere in this cast of characters.

Click here to view on YouTube  http://youtu.be/Pn7AbHAvDdE

Ian


SOB Info Notes for April 10, 2014


WOW !!!

The largest turn out ever, 70 showed up for the Thursday April 10th rides.  

As of today there are 82 members in the club, 11 new, 3 sponsors, and 68 renewals.  April is the month to join so if you are one of those waiting to pay your dues now is the time.

The jersey order from Castelli is due early in May, in time for the Santa Fe Century. A new order is partially done: 2 short sleeve jerseys, 5 long sleeve jerseys, i regular female short, and 1 bib short.  When 10 is reached in any category I will send the order to Castelli.

The cost break down is: jersey - $60.00 + 4.92 tax plus shipping unknown  and shorts - $65.00 + tax 5.33 and shipping unknown.  

As part of the Bike to Work week activities the SOBs will be leading a community ride on Friday May 16 (two days before the century). Edwin Crosswhite, Bob Bogart, and Denise Maaranen will be taking a lead roll but your help is needed.  Please e-mail ecrosswhite@ cybermesa.com if you can be there.

The following six SOBs completed the Traffic Skills 101 class this year and you may see them leading a ride in the future: Ward Freeman, Michael Knarr, Shirley Knarr, Robert, Richard, Alan Shapiro, and JP Masse. Congrats!!

The Tuesday ride meets in the DeVargas Center parking lot by Office Depot had 18 riders last week.  It leaves on the same time schedule as the Thursday rides but they are informal. The route is decided by the riders that show up for the ride.  The distances are usually in the 30+ mile range.

For Sale Page - SOB's

A few members have asked if they can put items up for sale on the Blog, plus I believe there is a market in our community for Buyers looking for Bike related items.

To acommodate this, if anyone interested can send me a listing of the Item(s) they wish to sell, the condition, price and the contact e-mail address, I will post it on a one time blog in a couple of weeks.

Item Description:

Condition:

Price:

Contact Info:


Ian

SAG Support to the Santa Fe Century, May 18th 2014

Neither the National Guard nor Capital Ford can supply us with sag vehicles this year. 

Are any of you who are not riding able to provide SAG Support to the Santa Fe Century Riders this year?

Expenses and a gratuity would be provided.

Anyone interested should contact Charlie at  ride@santafecentury.com

Thanks

Charlie

Route Slips for Thursday April 10th. 10AM

a Route slip

Bonanza Creek - Jaguar
Ride Leader: Stephen Griego

start time 10:00

Start: Hwy 599 Train Station parking lot
L: Hwy 599
R: Hwy 14 Cerrillos Rd
Regroup: Lone Butte General Store
R: Bonanza Creek Road
R: Frontage Rd  I-25
L: Entrada La Cienega (cross I-25)
R: Paseo Real / Airport Rd.
R: Paseo del Sol West
L: Jaguar Drive / Governor Miles Road
L: Camino Carlos Rey
R: Rodeo Road
R: Rail Trail
R: Rabbit Road
L: Oshara Blvd.
R: Richards Ave.
L: Dinosaur Trail
L: Cerrillos Hwy 14
R: Hwy 599
R: Entrance to Train Station
End: Hwy 599 Train Station parking lot

Total:  37.5 miles



b Route slip

Los Pinos - La Cienega 
Ride Leader: Gary Tausan

start time 10:00

Start: Hwy 599 Train Station parking lot
R: Hwy 599
L:  Frontage Rd. at light
R:  Los Pinos Rd. which is Hwy 54
R:  at T on Hwy 54/Paseo Rael
R: Paseo Real/Airport Rd. 
R: Hwy 599
L: Entrance to Train Station
End: Train Station parking lot

Total: 26 miles


c Route slip

Race Track
Ride Leaders: Pam & Brian

start time: 10:00

Start: Hwy 599 Train Station parking lot
R:  out of station to light
R:   Hwy 599
L:  Frontage Rd. at light
R:  Los Pinos Rd. which is Hwy 54
R:  at T on Hwy 54/Paseo Rael
R:  Calle Debra
L:  Calle Lisa
R:  Camino Montoya
L:  Paseo Rael
L:  Entrada La Cienega
L:  W. Frontage Rd I-25 
R:  Hwy 599
L:  Entrance to Train Station (at light)
End:  Train Station parking lot

Total: 19 miles

Breath Anatomy from Steve G.

Link to the complete informative article about our cycling lungs. For those who prefer précis I include the gist.


http://www.active.com/cycling/Articles/What-You-Need-to-Know-About-the-Air-You-Breathe.htm?page=1


KATHERINE BOWERS - BICYCLING.COM - WEB EXCLUSIVE CONTENT HELPING CYCLING ENTHUSIASTS GET THE MOST OUT OF EVERY RIDE.


...air temperature can also affect lung function. You might think a cough or wheeze is a sign you're out of shape, but it's not a normal fatigue response. Tod Olin, MD, pulmonologist with National Jewish Health in Denver. It may be exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EI, a form of asthma that kicks in during exertion or right afterward. Cold, dry air as well as pollution and allergens is known to trigger EIB in people who are susceptible. About 15 to 25 percent of the population suffers from it. 


"Someone with untreated EIB doesn't have a normal airway; it's like trying to pass oxygen through a small-bore straw," -Randy Wilber, PhD, FACSM, senior sports physiologist for the US Olympic Committee.The bottom line is that air should feed your lungs the same way that a healthy diet fuels your muscles. Here's how to keep your lungs healthy and working hard.


1. The nose warms and humidifies the air before it reaches the lungs and filters out pollutants. You're more likely to irritate your lungs when you breathe through your mouth.


2. The tubes that carry air into the lungs (the bronchi) have taste receptors. They don't actually "taste" anything, but the bronchi will dilate when they sense something bitter.


3. Though lungs don't stretch or bulk up the way your quads might, there is evidence that they do adapt to activity. Some high-altitude athletes have larger-than-normal lungs.


4. The diaphragm does most of the work of pulling air into your lungs. Breath training makes it thicker and stronger.


Humid Weather Affects Your Training


5. Because the left lung shares space with the heart, the right one is slightly bigger with three lobes, not two, but no more powerful. The surface area of your lungs is about the size of a tennis court.


6. Pollution can thicken the lining or scar it, both of which cause lung elasticity and function to diminish.


7. Microscopic sacs, alveoli, transfer oxygen into the blood and remove carbon dioxide. The average adult has about 300 million.


Lungs follow a circadian rhythm. One study showed they are most open between 4 and 5 p.m.



Embrace Hard Efforts


Riding your bike makes your heart and muscles handle oxygen more efficiently. Studies show high-intensity interval training has a more positive effect on respiratory muscle strength than long, steady efforts. -Systrom. A recent Health Canada study suggests that when the air quality is poor, going hard may be the best approach. In the experiment, cyclists who did a low-intensity ride in polluted air had to breathe harder to take in more oxygen to keep a fast pace. But when they rode at high intensity, they needed the same amount of oxygen regardless of the pollution level.


The finding surprised the study's lead researcher, Michael Koehle, MD, PhD, associate professor in the School of Kinesiology and the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of British Columbia. Koehle speculates that the body's adrenalin-fueled fight-or-flight response—which opens small airways in the lungs—overrides the effects of pollution.



Muscle Up


Not all breaths are created equal. …inhale slowly and deeply during your ride. This removes carbon dioxide more efficiently than rapid, shallow breathing. -Systrom. You can also try doing resistance work for your breathing muscles. When you work hard, they can be greedy, consuming about 10 to 15 percent of the oxygen you take in. -Alison McConnell, PhD, professor of applied physiology at Brunel University in the United Kingdom and author of Breathe Strong, Perform Better. Studies on cyclists have found that when these muscles fatigue, they steal oxygen from the arms and legs. Conversely, well-conditioned breathing muscles improve performance and use less oxygen. McConnell suggests a method called inspiratory muscle training, during which you add resistance when you breathe in.


It works most effectively if you use a product designed to make it harder to inhale. McConnell recommends one called POWER-Breathe, but there are others available. Do 30 reps twice a day, aiming for consecutive slow, deep breaths.



Keep 'Em Comfy


Lungs prefer warm, moist air. A study of elite cross-country skiers found that areas of their lung tissue became scarred from repeated exposure to cold, dry air, says Wilber. In frigid weather, ride during the warmest part of the day and use a neck gaiter around your nose and mouth to humidify the air. If you have asthma-like symptoms, such as a cough, wheezing, or shortness of breath, especially after exercise, check with your doctor.                              

Ride Slips for Thursday April 3rd - Start Time 10AM

Ride Slips for Thursday April 3rd - Start Time 10AM

a Route slip

Lamy
Ride Leader: Dave Simonson

Start: Museum Hill parking lot
L: Camino Lejo  (NE)
R: Old Santa Fe Trail
Turn around: hill top Canada Village
Return: Old Santa Fe Trail
L: Two Trails Road
L: Old Las Vegas Highway 
R: Hwy 285
L: Old Lamy Trail hwy 553
Turn around: Lamy Railroad Station
Return: Old Lamy Trail hwy 553
R: Hwy 285
L: Old Las Vegas Highway
R: El Goncho Way
L: Old Santa Fe Trail
L: Camino Lejo
End: Museum Hill Parking Lot 

Total 35 miles


b Route slip

Camp Stoney
Ride Leader: Denise Marranen

Start: Museum Hill parking lot
L: Camino Lejo  (NE)
R: Old Santa Fe Trail
Regroup: Two Trails Road.
Continue:  Old Santa Fe Trail
Regroup: hill top before Canada Village
R: to Camp Stoney
Turn around: Camp Stoney
L: Old Santa Fe Trail (NW)
L: Camino Lejo
End: Museum Hill Parking Lot 
Total 18 miles


c Route slip

Two Trails Road
Ride Leader: Rennie Finley

Start: Museum Hill parking lot
L: Camino Lejo  (NE)
R: Old Santa Fe Trail
Regroup: Two Trails Road.
R: Two Trails Road
R: Old Las Vegas Hwy
R: El Gancho Way
L: Old Santa Fe Trail
L: Camino Lejo
End: Museum Hill Parking Lot 

Total 11 miles

Bike to Work Week - Preliminary Draft Schedule


MONTH OF MAY 

• All Month - AFTER HOURS ALLIANCE – www.afterhoursalliance.com  Incentives to bike to local eating establishments/clubs 

• BIKE TO WORK WEEK – Santa Fe Trails: Take your bike and ride the bus free! www.santafenm.gov/transit 

Friday May 9th 
• New Mexico School for the Arts Supports Bike-to-Work Week! www.nmschoolforthearts.org/ 
 Check out their May 9th ArtSpring Gala and Raffle!! 

• Creative Santa Fe Supports Bike-to-Work Week: www.creativesantafe.org The FANTASE Dome Fest A multimedia interactive light festival. By connecting opaque and semi-opaque 360 degree domes, light installations will be seen from both inside and outside these structures. For six hours, the FANTASE Dome Fest will be free and open to the public to experience art projections, inspired design, music, and downtown vibrancy in a major community event. 

 6:00 Opening Statements (Mayor Gonzales, CrSF) 
      Daytime art installations 
 6:30 Angel Babies play 
 7:00 Initiate Skate Competition 
 7:35 Luke Carr Storming the Beaches with Logos in Hand play 
 7:40 All light art works will turn on 
 8:30 Thieves and Gypsys play 
 9:30 As In We plays 
 12:00am Closing 
 
Saturday, May 10th 
• 9:30 - 11:30 am - Community Cruise Kick-Off, Special South Side edition. Starting and ending at South Side Public Library. Navigate the South Side by bicycle by way of existing and future trails, bike lanes, and calmer connecting streets. To include visits to the County River Trail, future "Camino Real retracement trail" (including Relief Route underpass), future Acequia Trail, Tierra Contenta's Arroyo de los Chamisos Trail, and more. 

Sunday, May 11th – Mother’s Day - Don’t forget to get your Mom a card!!! 

Wednesday, May 14th 
• 6PM-8PM Walkable and Livable Communities Institute: www.walklive.org 
 Dan Burden/Robert Ping Public Presentation Santa Fe Convention Center : Nationally known experts on walk/bikeable/livable communities hosted by Santa Fe MPO with promotions by Creative Santa Fe 

Thursday May 15th 
• 7AM: Dan Burden/Robert Ping Guided Breakfast Bike Ride – Join our national experts as we cruise through a few key Santa Fe corridors and hear feedback along the way 

• 6PM: Santa Fe MIX www.mixsantafe.com 

(Bike Themed Event at the Solana Center 913 W. Alameda) A structure for interaction and collaboration among inspired individuals, entrepreneurs, innovators, businesses and organizations. Through monthly events that showcase talent and local resources MIX provides an avenue for personal contact and networking. Through innovative web tools, social media and micro- stimulus, MIX provides a mechanism for the development of ideas, businesses, and projects with corollary opportunities for promotion, recognition and start-up funding. 
• 6PM: Nelson Vails Documentary at the Jean Cocteau Cinema www.nelsonvails.com 

Professional cyclist, Silver Medalist and New York Bicycle messenger – Documentary/Keynote (Pending) 
Friday May 16th 
• MORNING BIKE TO WORK CONVOYS: led by David Griscom, Ken Hughes, Tim Rogers, David Bell, and Erick Aune 7AM – to Plaza where Mellow Velo will have sponsored Coffee and Breakfast Burritos!! 
 River Trail from Frenchy’s Field River Crossing – Ken Hughes 
 Eldorado Rail Trail – From the Agora Shopping Center to Plaza – David Bell 
 Arroyo Chamiso Trail – From Rodeo Road Underpass to Plaza – Erick Aune 2 
 Acequia Bikeway – From Casa Alegre (Otowi Dr.) to Plaza – Tim Rogers 
• 2PM-4PM- BIKE TO WORK BOOTH SET UP AT WATER TOWER  Santa Fe MPO 
 NMDOT 
 NMEMNRD 
 CHAINBREAKER COLLECTIVE - chainbreaker.org 
 Santa Fe Seniors on Bikes and Santa Fe Pedal queens… BCNM 
 Santa Fe Trails – Bus with Bike Rack Demos 
 Santa FE Conservation Trust (Invite) 
 Department of Health (Invite) 
 Mellow Velo Bike Shop Tent and will Invite Cinelli USA 
 General Notice to County/City staff Fire Dept. Police/NMSTATE Police (Invites needed) 
 DWI Prevention 

• 3:30PM – City/County Convoy Challenge – 2nd Year City/County staff and elected officials meet downtown and cruise to the Railyard by 4PM to help kick off the event. The City won last year… time for the County to step up. 

• 4:00PM – “bespoke” Outside Mag Festival Event @ Railyard www.outsidesantafe.com 

Handmade bikes, Oskar Blues & REEB, Bikes, Live Music, Bike Expo, Food Trucks, and Kaleidospoke Art Installation. 
• 4:00PM - BICYCLE BEAUTY PAGENT – Dust of your show piece and show it off along the side of the Market 

• 5:00PM – NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS – LIVE PERFORMANCE with BIKES 
• 5:20PM – Traditional Goat Head Piñata Beating Under the Water Tower 
• 5:30PM – Official Announcement – Santa Fe Silver Award for Bicycle Friendly Community via League of American Bicyclists 

• 5:45PM – CINELLI BIKE GIVE AWAY – WATER TOWER STAGE 
• 6:00PM – LIVE MUSIC BEGINS – WATER TOWER STAGE 
• 6-8PM Wise Fool New Mexico – Performance at Railyard Park www.wisefoolnewmexico.org 

Saturday, May 17 
9:30 - 11:30 am - Community Cruise, (traditional) Railyard edition. Starting and ending at Railyard Plaza. (Among other pieces, we will probably do the acequia alignment since it is the newest completed connection 
• 1-3PM Wise Fool New Mexico – Performance at Railyard Park 
• 6-8PM Wise Fool New Mexico – Performance at Railyard Park 
• Outside Bike Festival – Events/Rides/All Day Long 

Kids Track – Ages 4-12? Coordinate with Sandra Brice with the Railyard Community Corporation on possible locations and times. 505.982.33733 
• Amy Sandoval with Dept of Health is helping to coordinate kid’s bike helmet give-away 

Sunday, May 18th 
SANTA FE CENTURY www.santafecentury.com 


Ride qualities of Bike material - from Steve G.



From Thompson in Louisiana: How does a titanium tandem ride versus a steel (Cr-Mo), aluminum, or even carbon fiber. We currently ride a steel Santana Arriva and I dream of a titanium tandem. While visiting a bike shop in Seattle to rent a tandem for a weeklong credit card tour one of the shop employees was singing the praises of titanium. So, is a titanium tandem's ride that much different? I know it will last forever and will be slightly lighter than our bike, and have a bit higher end components, but the ride is the only reason I would upgrade. We don't ride with the go-fast crowd and are not into "bike bling", so the ride quality is the only reason I could justify upgrading. 

From: Gray: I own more bikes than I care to admit, currently three tandems and singles in steel, aluminum, titanium, and carbon. I love trying different frame materials with stiff, plush, forgiving geometry. After all these years my butt is still not sensitive enough to tell life-changing differences. Wheels, tires and tire pressure are far more critical to ride quality than most other factors. That's not to say you shouldn't buy a titanium bike, I have four in my garage and while I enjoy them all they all ride different. Frame material alone doesn't define the ride. This quote from an interview stuck with me. We hold our heads high at Cycles Gaansari. The challenge was convincing people to buy products without pandering to false desires about a product that can make them faster. If you can afford a titanium just wanting to own one is reason enough. If you set out hoping that it will be any more than a very subtle change you may be wishing for your money back. Carbon has more potential, but describing the differences or improvements in ride quality is seldom measurable.

From Mink: We’ve owned custom tandems in all materials, more bicycles than I can count, and tandems in every material: steel, aluminum, titanium and carbon. Liked all of them and I can't really say that I preferred titanium over our custom steel tandems. They were all impeccably designed frames and well built. To be honest, I'm not certain I would spend the extra money on Titanium versus steel unless you ride in and environment where the never rust qualities of titanium are beneficial. In our 60's we've settled into a daVinci custom Carbon tandem which is our favorite tandem in terms of a wonderful blend of ride compliance, handling, torsional stability and overall comfort.

From Trumbull: We have a custom Lynksey S&S coupled ti tandem. After riding a Co-Motion, a great bike itself, for several years, we took advantage of our proximity to Lynksey and took the plunge. It was spec’ed identically to the Co-Mo, so there is consistency to our comparison. We swapped riding the bikes from time to time and have had the Lynksey for several years now enjoying every mile on it, ok, maybe not so much on the uphills.  If I were to describe the differences between the two, the ti is a tad stiffer, but the ride is very similar to the good steel bike. 

From Murray: We have had a low-end steel Kuwahara, a Santana Sovereign aluminum and now Santana Team-ti tandems. The Ti is the best of the lot for a few
reasons already mentioned: smooth ride, forgiving finish. The Ti is a coupled travel tandem and definitely best for keeping its looks after multiple packing-unpacking. I agree that wheels and tires make a big difference. We rode two different brands of carbon before we bought the Team-Ti and found one "wiggly" and the other too small a frame style in comparison to the Team-Ti (captain is 6'2" and stoker 5'8”). Note from Steve, Wiggly a.k.a. fishtail effect happens if the tandem material is to thin for the rider’s combined weight. The rear will flex sideways out of synch from the front, too much flex. Re too small a frame style, Murray is talking about the bike's cockpit fit, which depends on the top tube length of any bicycle. Of course tandems have two cockpits, which need to fit comfortably for both riders. 

From: Scott: We have ridden commuters, various medium and high-end road bikes, cyclocross, European Dutch bikes, and mountain bikes over the years. We got our first tandem two years ago, a carbon Calfee, Ultegra and Ritchie components, Toplino wheels. It is a dream every time we get on it— sometimes four times a week. It is stable, predictable on descents, riding in the wind, responsive, quick to accelerate and stop. Just plain crazy fun. I agree with others that key factors for bike happiness are wheels and tires. Our steel Arriva is probably 35 lb. our Calfee 29. I have two single Serottas identical in every way except one is steel with carbon stays and one full carbon. The carbon is quicker, smoother, and more fun—.

From Pardo: How does frame material X ride compared to frame material Y? Ride usually has more to do with design than material. Yes, material has an effect, and especially if you consider weight and labor cost. But that is not a statement about the _material_ as such. Any given material can be "tuned" to a wide range of rides.
Design is by far the big effect here, not material. I have two similar half-bikes made of titanium. One was made by Sandvik of relatively light and flexible construction; the other a newer model with larger-diameter tubing. Both are titanium and the ride characteristics are, different. The lighter/flexier frame is comparable to an excessively flexy "steel is real" ride, while the heavier/stiffer frame is comparable to an aluminum Klein I rode stiffer yet responsive. Similarly, I had two steel tandems, one made with heavy steel tubing, the other with light steel tubing. The rides were incomparable: one very stiff, the other very flex. Not to say that any of the above are bad, but different enough to know in the first five minutes, before you hit the curves, get airborne, etc. Finally, wheels and tires will also alter the feel.

Alternate Durango ride - September 3rd through 6th 2014

Pam Parfitt and Brian Morgan have stepped up to offer another ride the first week in September in the Durango area.  It will be three nights and four days including two half days of driving.  Three nights will be in Durango riding out to various places there.  Pam lived in Durango for many years and knows it very well.  She will have a tour where you will explore the area, experience its beauty, have fun and ride areas that the other group will not be able to see.  The mileage will be 15 to 35 miles a day with options for longer rides.  You will ride on all four days.  The estimated cost for this ride will be in the $400-$500 range.  

If you are interested, please let Pam know ASAP:  Pam Parfitt:  sffiddle@gmail.com  She has a limit of 15 riders.

Ride Slips for Thursday April 3rd

a Route slip

Lamy
Ride Leader: Dave Simonson

Start: Museum Hill parking lot
L: Camino Lejo  (NE)
R: Old Santa Fe Trail
Turn around: hill top Canada Village
Return: Old Santa Fe Trail
L: Two Trails Road
L: Old Las Vegas Highway 
R: Hwy 285
L: Old Lamy Trail hwy 553
Turn around: Lamy Railroad Station
Return: Old Lamy Trail hwy 553
R: Hwy 285
L: Old Las Vegas Highway
R: El Goncho Way
L: Old Santa Fe Trail
L: Camino Lejo
End: Museum Hill Parking Lot 

Total 35 miles


b Route slip

Camp Stoney
Ride Leader: Denise Marranen

Start: Museum Hill parking lot
L: Camino Lejo  (NE)
R: Old Santa Fe Trail
Regroup: Two Trails Road.
Continue:  Old Santa Fe Trail
Regroup: hill top before Canada Village
R: to Camp Stoney
Turn around: Camp Stoney
L: Old Santa Fe Trail (NW)
L: Camino Lejo
End: Museum Hill Parking Lot 
Total 18 miles


c Route slip

Two Trails Road
Ride Leader: Rennie Finley

Start: Museum Hill parking lot
L: Camino Lejo  (NE)
R: Old Santa Fe Trail
Regroup: Two Trails Road.
R: Two Trails Road
R: Old Las Vegas Hwy
R: El Gancho Way
L: Old Santa Fe Trail
L: Camino Lejo
End: Museum Hill Parking Lot 

Total 11 miles

fat burning, the Santa Fe Century, from Steve G.

Researching lipid oxidation, fat burning, for people thinking about the Santa Fe Century, I came across this article written by Lyle McDonald whose training goals are fat loss, muscle gain, improved performance. He also writes with a sense of humor. I cut and edited the following article for a quicker read. His background is weightlifting, but he makes good training points. Gist of this article follows the Greek philosophy "everything in moderation, nothing to the extreme… but one must do some sweating."


Steady State and Interval Training

In recent years, there has been quite the over-popularization of the concept of interval training, along with a rather major backlash against traditional forms of aerobic training, for fat loss. It’s not uncommon to read how low intensity aerobics is useless for fat loss, everybody should just do intervals, regular aerobics makes you lose muscle, etc. 
Aerobic training has been (over) emphasized over all other kinds of activity. As well, people got the absolutely wrong idea about how to use it for fat loss so you have people trotting along on the treadmill at an intensity that is just slightly higher than sitting on the couch, burning a couple of hundred calories in an hour and wondering whey they aren’t losing fat. Basically, people get a little over-enthusiastic about a certain type of training (or eating), take it to some absurd extreme, get into problems, find an alternative and decide that the first type of training is useless, overrated, etc, etc, blah, blah, blah and they jump to the opposite extreme. They jump from one extreme to the other until, hopefully, they come back to some happy medium.
Definitions
Steady state training: Any form of aerobic/cardiovascular training where some reasonably steady intensity is maintained for an extended period. So this might be something akin to 20-60 minutes at a steady heart rate of 140-150 (could be higher, could be lower). I’m just going to call this cardio or aerobics, even though I know some people get into longwinded semantic arguments about it.
Interval training: Any form of activity that alternates higher intensity activity (such as 30-60 seconds almost all out) with periods of lower intensity activity. The rest interval can be passive (sit on your butt) or active (keep moving at a low intensity). While weight training can technically be considered interval training, I’m going to restrict this article to interval training done with standard cardio modes (i.e. running, cycling, stairmaster, etc). A typical interval workout for fat loss might be a short warmup followed by 5 repeats of 60 seconds near maximum intensity alternated with 60-90 seconds of very low intensity activity, followed by a 5′ cool down. This is often referred to as high intensity interval training (HIIT) which differentiates it from aerobic interval training discussed immediately below.
Aerobic interval training: Hybrid training often used by very untrained beginners who are simply unable to perform 20 minutes or more of continuous aerobic activity. So they might perform 5 minutes of low intensity aerobic activity prior to taking a short break, followed by another 5 minutes of low intensity aerobic training, until they accumulated 20-30 minutes of activity. Over their first several weeks of training, they would try to increase the duration of each aerobic interval session while decreasing the rest interval. A sprinter might run 10 repeats of 200 meters but at a very low intensity (aerobic intensity) with 100 meters of walking in-between. In this article, I’m not talking about aerobic interval training when I compare and contrast traditional aerobic training and interval training; aerobic interval training is sort of a third category that doesn’t apply to this discussion.
Moving on
Ok, so now that we’re on the same page definition wise, I want to compare and contrast aerobic and interval training in terms of potential pros and cons. This will allow us to look at how to integrate the different types of training into real world workout schemes.
Steady state aerobics: Pros
  1. Depending on the intensity, steady state aerobics tends to burn more calories during the exercise bout than interval training.
  2. More appropriate for beginners.
  3. Can be done more frequently, daily or more often although this depends on the duration, intensity and frequency as well as the setup of the rest of the training program.
  4. Regular exercise helps people stick to their diet better. Interval training can’t be performed daily, low intensity activity may help people stay on their diets.
Steady State Aerobics: Cons
  1. Most indoor aerobics modes tend to be boring for long durations. Exercise can, of course, be done outdoors but this raises a whole separate set of issues.
  2. An excess of endurance training, especially at higher intensities seems to cause muscle loss, decrease strength and power, and cause overtraining. 
  3. Too much repetition of the same mode of aerobics can generate overuse injuries, and cyclists are prone to knee problems, swimming causes rotator cuff issues. This can be avoided by non-endurance athletes by rotating the type of activity being done.
  4. Unless people are tremendously aerobically fit, it can be difficult to burn a huge number of calories unless the duration of each workout is ridiculous. So, at moderate intensities, the average person might burn 5-10 calories/minute; a 145 lb person burns about 100 calories per mile walking or running. So over an hour aerobic session, you might achieve 300-600 calories burn. This can certainly add up if done daily, but it’s still a fairly small expenditure. The people trotting along on the treadmill or spinning on the bike at low intensities, often for only 30 minutes, are burning jack calories. 
Before continuing, I should probably bring up one of the more idiotic arguments against steady state aerobics here. The argument goes something along the lines of “Aerobic training is useless because, as you adapt and become more efficient, the same workout that burned a significant amount of calories over 40 minutes takes 60 minutes because you’re getting more efficient.” This is about as logical as saying that weight training is ineffective because the same weight that was difficult for 12 repetitions is now too light, and you have to do more repetitions with it.
And the same exact thing can be done with aerobic training: as the body adapts and you become fitter, you can increase your caloric expenditure by increasing the intesity of your workout. So say that you were doing the stairmaster at level 8 and a heart rate of 140 beats per minute for 40 minutes. Now you’ve adapted and level 8 is only a heart rate of 130. Well, you could go to an hour, or you could increase the intensity to level 9 and burn more calories during those same 40 minutes. In addition, exercise efficiency doesn’t vary that much; in cycling for example, it varies between about 20-25%. So even if you increase your efficiency by 5%, this would only change the caloric expenditure for a given exercise bout by that same 5%. A 400 calorie workout becomes a 380 calorie workout.
Interval training: Pros
  1. For a given time investment, interval training leads to a greater fat loss and this occurs despite a smaller calorie burn during activity. This is because interval training generates a much larger EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption) which are the calories burned after exercise.
  2. Interval training may improve the muscle’s ability to use fat for fuel more effectively than aerobic training (note: recent studies have also suggested that interval training can generate very rapid improvements in endurance performance in a very short period).
  3. Time efficient: Not everybody has the time to devote to an hour (or more) of aerobic training per day. A properly set up interval workout may only take 15-20 minutes.
  4. Time seems to pass faster: Compared to regular aerobics, which can be mind numbingly dull.
Interval Training: Cons
  1. The intensity of intervals makes them inappropriate for beginners. One exception is a style of training called aerobic intervals which I mentioned above. But high intensity interval training is simply inappropriate for beginning exercisers.
  2. Intervals are high intensity training, this has implications for the overall training setup (discussed in more detail in part 2) If you think you can train legs in the weight room 2-3X/week and do intervals an additional 2-3X/week on alternate days, you are incorrect unless you are deliberately trying to get injured.
  3. Higher risk of injuries on activity with high impact activities such as sprinting carrying a higher injury risk for heavier individuals than intervals done on the bike or Stairmaster.
  4. Limited in how many days they can be performed. Two to three days per week is about the maximu for interval training, most endurance athletes won’t do intervals more than twice/week. Have I heard of people trying to interval daily? Yes. Do I think it’s a good idea? No.
  5. Intervals hurt, especially intervals in the 60-90 second range where muscular acid levels are very high. If you’re not willing to push yourself, you won’t get much out of interval training. You know the warnings on most aerobics machines, that tell you to stop if you feel signs of exhaustion or fatigue; that’s what a properly done interval program should feel like. Sensations of burning in your legs (from high acid levels in the muscle) along with extreme discomfort are not only common but expected. Some people also report nausea initially, this can be made worse if they have eaten too close to training.

2014 Santa Fe Century Training Plan - from Steve G.

Spin Doc, one of our club sponsors, has a good training document for those of you who are planning for the Santa Fe Century or one of the optional shorter distances.
 

http://www.spindoc.com/Training/SpinDoc%202014%20Santa%20Fe%20Century%20Training%20Calendar%20.pdf


SpinDoc 2014 Santa Fe Century Training Plan

We’ll present some clinics leading into the Century helping you to prepare for the best possible ride. One will focus on what you need to do to prepare your bike; another will review what you want to do for yourself in prep, what you might want to bring along, and any other questions you might have. When the dates are set for these, we’ll post them on the web site as well as announce them at class times.

In addition, starting in March, we’ll organize training rides from SpinDoc. You’ll have the opportunity to learn some good road riding skills, get used to riding with other cyclists around you, and start increasing your miles. It also gives you the chance to test ride some clothing, accessories and gear you have and are considering utilizing on event day. You don’t want to head out for the Century in a cycling short you’ve never worn before. As the weeks progress, the cyclists will be broken into groups based on the distance they plan to ride.

We want everyone to have a fun, successful ride, regardless of the distance you have set as your goal.

February: Ride 2-3 times per week at a steady pace, trying to maintain a cadence of 90-95 whenever possible.

Keep track of your daily mileage. You will start adding small increments to that base figure (your total miles for that week). If you are riding in our classes, keep your PRE (Perceived Rate of Exertion) steady at a 6 to 7. You are strengthening your aerobic base, so you want to keep your workload fairly moderate.

Start increasing your distance by adding 10% to the total mileage you rode in Week 1. For instance, if you rode a total of 50 miles, add a total of 5 additional miles to this week’s distance. If you are riding inside, your work plan will remain the same, but you should start trying to get some outdoor miles under your belt so you can start to increase the time you are literally sitting on that bike saddle. Remember that part of your plan is adapting the soft tissue under your sits bones to additional time in the saddle. Riding a Saturday morning “double” (two classes) at SpinDoc can get you nearly two hours of saddle time in bad weather.

Feb. 10-Feb. 16: Increase your distance another 10%. Also add one Intense Steady State ride as one of the three rides. We’ll be doing this on Fridays in class, so your two outdoor rides should be at a lower exertion rate (that 6-7 PRE) but include the increased distance. The intense steady state ride should be a shorter distance, so keeping it inside and in a one-hour format works well should the weather not comply. If you do not attend Friday classes, add this workout on your own.

Feb. 16-Feb. 22: Increase total distance ridden in the week an additional 10%, and increase the segment lengths of the Intense Steady State. (If you rode 10 min at a 7 followed by 5 min recovery, times 3 sets, this week you will increase the work segments to 15 min, keep recovery at 5 min, and maintain 3 sets.

SpinDoc, 628 Old Las Vegas Highway, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-466-4181 www.spindoc.com

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March: We start to add strength segments.

Feb. 23-Mar. 1: Maintain one easy steady state ride, continuing to add distance/time in the saddle. Maintain one intense steady state ride. Add hill repeats; either find a hilly section of road to ride (such as Old Las Vegas Highway, or Old Santa Fe Trail). You can also ride up and over Lamy Hill a couple times as your hill repeat. Practice standing out of the saddle as you climb. Keep your cadence as high as you can, continuing to down-shift as you go. You can do two of these if you feel up to it in the course of the week.

Mar. 2-Mar. 8: Easy recovery week. Long steady easy rides are good, as are a day or two off completely, or doing another activity altogether (walking, hiking, snowshoeing, etc.)

Mar. 9-Mar. 15: More of the same as Feb. 24-Mar. 1, simply increasing distances.

Mar. 16-22: Continue to increase distances, and if you are riding one hill repeat per week, increase to two. If you can only fit in three workouts, maintain a long easy ride, and the two hill repeats. Your goal is to be comfortable riding 75% of the distance you will be riding at the event. Depending on your mileage when you started, once you hit that goal on your long steady rides, it is unnecessary to add additional miles. You will probably not yet be at 75 miles – your pre-Century goal if you are riding the full 100 – but if you are, you can maintain that distance, or add a little.

Mar. 23-Mar. 29: Continue as with the prior week.

April: We’ll be adding speed to the workouts. Since this is not a race and you won’t be needing to sprint past anyone, it is not mandatory that speed work is incorporated. However, it adds a tremendous amount of strength to your performance with fairly short increments of work time.

Mar. 30-April 5: Easy active recovery week. Long steady easy rides are good, as are one or two days off completely, or doing another activity altogether (walking, hiking, snowshoeing, etc.)

April 6-12: In addition to your long steady easy ride, one intense steady state ride, hill repeats (1-2 per week), you’ll add ONE interval workout per week. We’ll be doing these in Friday classes, so you can do them then, or on your own. You’ll alternate working at a high RPE (8 or more) for a specific period of time, then recover at a RPE of 6 for the same duration. For instance, do 8 minutes on, followed by 8 minutes off, then recover for a full 5, and repeat. You can break up your intervals in many ways, and vary the lengths of time. You can also incorporate Tabata intervals (20 seconds max/10 seconds recovery x 8 for a set, followed by 5 minutes full recovery and a second set).

April 13-19April 20-26: Continue to add miles in the saddle as you follow the prior week’s schedule through these two weeks.

April 27-May 3: Easy recovery week. Long steady easy rides are good, as are one or two days off completely, or doing another activity altogether (walking, hiking, snowshoeing, etc.)

SpinDoc, 628 Old Las Vegas Highway, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-466-4181 www.spindoc.com

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May: You’re nearly there. You have lengthened your hours in the saddle by a tremendous amount. If you plan on riding the full 100 miles of the Century, your long steady ride should be a minimum of 70 miles by now. You have one more week of actual training followed by a week of taper (reducing the work each day to allow more recovery time before your big ride). You will not be adding any more strength or endurance to your engine at this point, and pushing it thinking you’ll do so is actually counterproductive and potentially detrimental. It is often said that you can’t win your race with your taper, but you can lose it. Believe it. Stick to your plan.

May 4-10: Your goal for your long steady ride should be at least 75 miles (if you plan to ride the full century). One intense steady state ride, one or two hill repeat rides, and one day of intervals, early in the week, are prescribed.

May 11-17: Taper and recover. You’ll want to plan the week prior, May 4-10, to flow nicely into this week. Since May 10 should be an interval day, you’ll want to make sure that the interval day in the prior week is around May 5th, no closer to the 10th than that. Plan accordingly.

May 11: Intervals, 20-30 minutes
May 12: Hill repeats, 2 sets, working at an RPE of 6-7, 45-60 minutes
May 13: Active recovery or a day off; you can take an easy fun short ride, or hike, walk, swim, etc. May 14: Intense steady state work, RPE at 7 or so, for 30 minutes
May 15: One set of hill repeats, 30-45 minutes, working at an RPE of 6-7

May 16: Some athletes like to take the day off two days out from their event, not the day before; if you take today as your recovery day, take a leisurely walk, an easy swim, etc. Don’t go hiking Atalaya. If you prefer to take the day before, do an easy, fairly low distance steady state ride, RPE at 5, for an hour or less.

May 17: If you took your recovery on May 16th, take an easy 30 minute ride today just to loosen things up and get your blood moving. Otherwise, it is your recovery day that should include that leisurely stroll or swim, if anything.

Get a good night’s sleep. Remember it is NOT a race. The only one judging your performance is YOU. Bring your sunscreen, lip balm, snacks, water, and flat repair stuff. Remember the entire course is sagged so you don’t need to carry the world on your back. If you can’t stuff it in a jersey pocket, you don’t need it. You will probably want a windbreaker and/or arm warmers at the start, but they’ll roll up tight and fit into a pocket. Make sure you leave an open pocket for them. Avoid the temptation to wear a camelback. If you are riding the Century, you won’t want the weight on your back. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to refill your water bottles at each stop.

Among others, these are some of the points we’ll review at the SpinDoc pre-Century meetings. Although the aid stations plan to have food available, including peanut and butter sandwiches, don’t bet your day on it. Have something with you to eat. Just one PB&J can propel you another twenty miles down the road. Depending upon the pace you set, you may arrive at an aid station only to find no sandwiches. When you’re feeling bonky, looking at Heartbreak Hill, and have no food, hunger is less a vague concept, and more a real problem requiring a solution.

SpinDoc, 628 Old Las Vegas Highway, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-466-4181 www.spindoc.com 

SOB Info Notes March 15, 2014


The Thursday riding schedule begins in a little over two week on April 3rd.  Starting time is 10:00 am from the Museum Hill parking area. Check the posted schedule on the web site: santafesobs.com for the rest of the years schedule.  The Tuesday rides start at the same time each week as the Thursday rides but they all meet at DeVargas Mall in the parking area by Office Depot.

The current membership numbers are:  Total membership is 52 which includes 6 new members and our 3 sponsors. The month of April is the membership drive so be sure to take care of that when you sign-in for the regular ride.

The Traffic Skills 101 class has nine participates this year. A special thanks to Judy Costlow and Stephen Griego for taking an active roll in assisting Edwin Crosswhite in teaching the material.  Thursday March 28th is the last session.

The Official SOB jersey order, (yellow with a multicolored bicycle on the back) is being finalized and sent to Castelli this week.  The ordering process will be on going during the year and when ten items are ordered from Edwin it will be forward to Castelli.  Right now we have enough to order the jerseys.  Three more shorts are required before that item will be sent. Contact ecrosswhite@cybermesa.com to place an order.

The club members should be very appreciative of your Board that they would authorize an outside vender to sell a jersey when they already have an official jersey developed by it’s own members. The red jersey with the license plate design on the back should be delivered in May.

Bike Santa Fe will sponsor it’s annual bike swap meet on Saturday, March 29 (rain date April 5) in the same location as in previous years which is the parking lot near Rob & Charlie's on St. Michael's Drive near Llano St.

Open for shopping at 10:00 am, vendors should arrive by 9:00 am to set up. There is a $2 entrance fee. Vendors will be charged $5 or 5%, whichever is greater. If you would like them to sell your stuff for you, there will be a 25% fee.

At this time we are soliciting volunteers to help us set up and break down, and run the event. Volunteers can shop for free (admittedly, not a huge incentive) and will get first chance on sale items (perhaps a significant incentive), in addition to earning our eternal gratitude and a modest deposit in your karmic bank account (depending on your personal circumstances, possibly a substantial incentive). If you have a truck or van to help us move tables and tents, we would greatly appreciate your assistance. Volunteers will be asked to show up around 8:00 am and we expect to be packing up by around 2:00 pm. Please contact us ASAP at: Bike Santa Fe bikesantafe@gmail.com

Edwin Crosswhite, SOB Secretary

FINAL NOTICE .. UPDATED LICENSE PLATE JERSEY

 FINAL NOTICE FOR ORDERING THE UPDATED LICENSE PLATE JERSEY
                                       ORDER CLOSING DATE: March 15.........    ORDER SHIP DATE: MAY 9
                                                   (well in time to show it off on the Santa Fe Century)
                                                       STILL SHY OF THE MINIMUM!!!!!!!!!!!!!
                                                  
     CHANGES as stated including..new .front panel with SOB  logo utilizing SFRailroad  logo plus
                   ...elimination of sponsors on back and updates to 2014-2015 on plated            

                    Once again the link for ordering is    : www.voler.com/custom/ordering/li/4736


THE UPDATED LICENSE PLATE JERSEY

                                                     THE UPDATED LICENSE PLATE JERSEY
Earlier, I blogged the following which some may have missed. This is in regards to the SOB authorized License Plate jersey, as pictured, which will include the changes below.. 
As of 2:30pm on February 28 we are six shy of the minimum as we rapidly approach the closing date!

                     ORDER CLOSING DATE: March 15               ORDER SHIP DATE: MAY 9
                                       (well in time to show it off on the Santa Fe Century)
                                                  
                                                                CHANGES
The new version which can be ordered through the Voler website below will have a major change on the front. The Zia symbol will be replaced with the SOB logo which can be viewed by going to the New Mexico Seniors on Bikes website. This is a version of the Santa Fe Railroad logo with type wrapped around top and bottom. Additionally there will be minor changes in type elements and sponsors will be eliminated.
One other important element; the years on the bottom left and right of the plate will reflect the production years of this and following jerseys. This one will have 2014 and 2015. This change could allow for easy updating in future years as new members want jerseys.

Feel free to contact Herb Schon at schonherb@comcast.net or leave phone message at (505) 466-2955 if you need any further information

Once again the link for ordering is    : www.voler.com/custom/ordering/li/4736



Annual bike swap - Saturday March 29th.

Greetings Bike Santa Fe supporters!

We are contacting you to inform you of our annual bike swap. This year we will be holding the event on Saturday, March 29 (rain date April 5) in the same location as in previous years, the parking lot near Rob & Charlie's on St. Michael's Drive near Llano St.

We will open for shopping at 10, vendors should arrive by 9 to set up. Members shop free, for others there is a $2 entrance fee. Vendors will be charged $5 or 5%, whichever is greater. If you would like us to sell your stuff for you, there will be a 25% fee.

At this time we are soliciting volunteers to help us set up and break down, and run the event. Volunteers can shop for free (admittedly, not a huge incentive) and will get first dibs on sale items (perhaps a significant incentive), in addition to earning our eternal gratitude and a modest deposit in your karmic bank account (depending on your personal circumstances, possibly a substantial incentive). If you have a truck or van to help us move tables and tents, we would greatly appreciate your assistance. Volunteers will be asked to show up around 8 and we expect to be packing up by around 2. Please contact us ASAP if you can help.

Hope to see you there. This event gets bigger and better every year!

Checkout the Albuquerque Journal's "Live Well" from Mark

      Checkout the Albuquerque Journal's "Live Well" Magazine for March, 2014.  In it, Karin and Richard Roth are featured not only with feature article but also with wonderful photos on the front cover and inside of the Magazine!  Many kudos to the Roths!

Regards,

Mark

Unscheduled Rides reminder Tuesday 11AM

With the early onset of Spring just a reminder that our Unscheduled Rides are starting from the DeVargas Mall near Office Depot at 11AM. on Tuesdays

Also Paul Basile writes that he has some jerseys and jackets for sale and will have them in his vehicle for folks to check out beginning next Tuesday.  They're a combination of short sleeve and long sleeve jerseys and jackets, both cool weather and summer weather weights, and are either L's or XL's.  of course all are in like new condition…"I'm just trying to increase my closet space.  prices will range from $20-$40 depending on jersey/jacket, short/long sleeve and weight.  no reasonable offer refused."

If you haven't already, you can join the Unscheduled Rides Blog here:

http://www.sobrideblog.cosinecs.com/


Official SOB jersey on sale now

Official SOB jersey on sale now.

A BIG CHANGE - the SOB Logo will be on the front.  

The base color is yellow with red sleeves.  The side panels are turquoise with Seniors On Bikes written on them.  The bicycle with multicolored wheels will appear on the back and sleeves.  Castelli is the manufacturer and the cost is projected to be $60.00.

A word of caution: The sizing is small!  No orders will be accepted until you take your measurement and compare with the Castelli sizing chart. The chart is in centimeters so multiply by  2.54 to get the inch equivalent.  See chart below.


 No money necessary until you receive the merchandise.  There will be photos available in the next week or so.

If you are interested contact Edwin at: ecrosswhite@cybermesa.com.
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Gearing down recommendations - from Steve G.

I see some of our seniors are preparing for our upcoming ride season. Following discussion and bike calculation program may help with pondered upgrade decisions.

Current Trek Domane 4 Ultegra 34/50 crankset, Ultegra 11-28 Cassette 10 gears, had a year, prior bike triple easier on hills (6’3” 200lbs) lowest gear combo had a ratio of 1.11

Local bike store modification recommended Mountain bike derailleur with a new cassette and chain Shimano XT mtn bike deraileur, Shimano Ultegra or  SLX chain, 11/34 10 gear cassette… this will get me down to a 1.00 gear ration lowest combo

What do you think of the recommendation?

Will not make enough of a difference I’m afraid. Your current Trek gears are 120 inches to 32 climbing inches. Proposed 34 cog modification will only change climbing gear to 26 inches. 
Current Trek climbing low ratio with the 28 cog is 1.2, modification to the 34 cog will give you 1.0, not enough to make a physiological or muscle fatigue difference. You can throw all these numbers, cogs, rings, cadence, speed into a program bikecalc.com and wrestle with numbers to your heart’s content.

Bear with me, lets look at some more numbers slowly, and think about how your body feels at two pedaling points 80 rpm and 90 rpm. Currently your Trek ratio at either cadence is 4.6 on 50/11 cog, and 1.2 on 34/28 cog. Pedaling 80 rpm cadence your speed is 28.5 mph in the 50/11 cog versus 32 mph at 90 rpm. Climbing at 80 rpm in the 34/28 cog gets you 7.6 mph versus 8.5 mph at cadence 90 rpm. Here is the kicker with the 34 cog climbing, same, 80 rpm 7.6 mph and 90 rpm 8.5 mph. Naw, pshaw, really?

Ones cycling expectations determine cycling pleasure. 

Before I make suggestions I need to know a few things about your cycling expectations, current conditioning, any joint issues, and current average club ride cadence. With your height and weight it sounds like your somatotype, body classification, is mesomorph. I don’t know your age, but master age club riders, depending on cycling experience and motivation, tend to have a natural more comfortable cadence in the low 70s, which is fine at "B" level club rides at lower climbing speeds. On the other hand if you are motivated to hang with the climbing “A" master cyclists, you can do it without the proposed modification.

Happy to follow up on this if you wish.

By the way, my current club ride set up is one front chain ring 34 teeth with a ten speed 12-27 cassette with 33c tires. I’m betting with my expectations I’ll be switching to at least a 38 ring by the second club ride this year, oh yeah, and back to my 25c or 27c pave tires

New SOB Jerseys from Herb

We are still below the minimum for the wonderful new SOB jerseys which includes all "top" items be they a jersey, long or short sleeve, vests, arm warmers, jackets, etc...whatever you see on the link that you would wear above the waist, except cumberbunds.                    

Pictured below are the front and back of the SOB license plate jersey.
The new version which can be order will have a major change on the front. The Zia symbol will be replaced with the SOB logo which can be viewed by going to the New Mexico Seniors on Bikes website. This is a version of the Santa Fe Railroad logo with type wrapped around top and bottom. Additional there will be minor changes in type elements and sponsors will be eliminated.
One other important element; the years on the bottom left and right of the plate will reflect the production years of this and following jerseys. This one will have 2014 and 2015. This change will allow for easy updating in future years as new members want jerseys.

Once again the link for ordering is    : http://www.voler.com/custom/ordering/li/4736

Feel free to contact Herb Schon at schonherb@comcast.net or leave phone message at (505) 466-2955 if you need any further information 







                                            Welcome to the Voler Online Ordering System

Your team has decided to use the Voler Custom Online Order System for collecting and processing your cycling apparel order. Please follow the steps below to place your individual order for inclusion in the overall team order.

1. Click on this link to access your team order site: http://www.voler.com/custom/ordering/li/4736

2. Click on “LOGIN” to enter your Login/Billing Info. Click on “Create Account” to save the information and to create your new User ID and Password. You will automatically be directed to the home page for your team order. If you are a returning customer, please use your original Login and Password.

3. Click on “Begin Shopping" to gain access to the orderable products page. To place items in your shopping cart, click on the item you want to order, then the options you want to select, then the “Add to cart” button. You can choose to “View Your Bag” or “Continue Shopping” after adding each item. Repeat these steps for each item you want to order.

4. After placing the last item you want to order in your shopping cart, click on “View Your Bag” to display the items. Carefully review the items and make any necessary modifications or deletions. Because each item is custom built, refunds and exchanges will not be accepted. After you have confirmed your order is correct, click on “Proceed to Checkout” to complete the secure checkout process by entering your credit card payment information.

5. After you have completed the secure checkout process, an Order Confirmation will automatically be displayed and e-mailed to you for your records.

'RISING FROM ASHES' - SCREEN SANTA FE 3/12

RISING FROM ASHES, AWARD-WINNING DOCUMENTARY FILM ABOUT TEAM RWANDA, COMING TO SANTA FE ON MARCH 12

Rising From Ashes, the award-winning feature-length documentary about Team Rwanda, will premiere in Santa Fe on Tuesday, March 11 at 7 p.m. when the cycling film screens at The Screen. The event is sponsored by the Bicycle Coalition of New Mexico.

Rising From Ashes is a joyous and uplifting independent film about the development of a national cycling team in Rwanda, a country still affected deeply by the genocide that tore the East African nation apart in 1994.

Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jacques “Jock” Boyer moves to Rwanda in 2006 to help a group of struggling survivors of the genocide to pursue their dream of creating a national cycling team. Members of the fledgling team were children left orphaned by the genocide a decade earlier. Their pasts are painful. As they set out against impossible odds, both Boyer – fighting his own past demons – and the team find new purpose as they rise from the ashes of their pasts through remarkable achievements, both big and small.

The documentary tells a story of redemption, hope and second chances. It is not about the bike; however, the bicycle becomes a tool that has helped change a nation.

Team Rwanda began as a cycling organization, but became so much more once organizers realized the greater needs of the athletes. Many of the riders could not read or write, lived in homes without water and electricity, were malnourished and had never received healthcare. But there was still a greater issue, the issue of the heart. These riders were all recovering from the traumatic psychological effects of the 1994 genocide, which claimed the lives of more than half a million Rwandans, or roughly one-fifth of the nation’s population. Most of the riders were left orphaned by the massacres that claimed their parents’ lives.

While Team Rwanda has taken care of the physical and mental issues of the riders, it has also provided something greater – hope for a nation. Rwanda is a country still recovering from one of the world’s most devastating genocides and the country has longed for heroes. The riders of Team Rwanda have become more than just a cycling team; they have become ambassadors for a country rising from its ashes. They have given the small nation a vision of something greater than itself and renewed a sense of purpose.

But Rising From Ashes is more than a movie. It’s a story that relates to each and every person. It’s a gateway of hope. However, this is just the beginning. Since 2005, Team Rwanda has developed a model for caring for passionate athletes and it has gone on to expand that vision. In 2012, Team Rwanda began its next phase, the development of Africa’s first all-black, all-African team to attempt the greatest cycling event in the world, the Tour de France, after having qualified its first rider for the Olympic Games in London.
Daphne Howland of The Village Voice called Rising From Ashes “a remarkable documentary. It’s not just about a cycling team; it’s a testament to what happens when human beings care for one another.” “The film is crisp and economical,” said Frank Schneck of The Hollywood Reporter. “The film … avoids extraneous melodramatics, which, after all, are hardly necessary in a tale that already contains such inherently powerful drama.”
The film is also about redemption for Boyer, who was the first American rider to ever compete in the Tour de France back in 1983. One of America’s most fabled riders, Boyer grew up in Northern California battling long-time rival Tom Ritchey for national supremacy. Boyer left the U.S. as a 17-year-old to compete in the Tour de France, but upon his return to the United States after a prolific racing career in Europe, he lost it all. In this period of darkness, in which Boyer was incarcerated for an improper relationship with a minor, he reconnected with Ritchey, who had toured Rwanda – known as the “land of a thousand hills” – on a cycling trip in 2005.

Ritchey approached Boyer with an unlikely proposition – an offer to become coach of Rwanda’s first national cycling team. The success of the team came down to Boyer’s decision to move to Rwanda and invest himself completely in the project, gaining the trust of the riders he coached.

Over six years in the making, Rising From Ashes was produced by two partnering non-profit organizations, Gratis 7 Media Group and Project Rwanda. Narrated by Oscar winner Forest Whitaker, the film has been completely donor-funded and was produced through more than $800,000 in donated funds. Since its release in 2012, the film has won awards at more than a dozen film festivals worldwide.

Advance tickets are $10 and can be purchased online at www.thescreensf.com. Tickets at the door will be $15. The Screen is located at 1600 St. Michael’s Drive in Santa Fe.
The mission of the Bicycle Coalition of New Mexico is simple and succinct: to increase the number of bicyclists in New Mexico by promoting cycling, providing education and advocating for the rights of cyclists throughout the state. For more information, visit www.bikenm.org.

For more information about the film, or to view the trailer, go to www.risingfromashesthemovie.com, or on Facebook at Rising From Ashes The Movie.

Bicycle Design thoughts from Steve G.

The tandem list has been discussing bike adjustment measuring points when changing captains, front rider, and stokers, rear admiral. When adjusting a tandem for different stokers I look at and discuss current bike/cockpit measurements, current issues with neck, back, wrists, knees, and adapt measurements accordingly. When thinking about a new bike, stock or custom, comparing some of the following measuring point helps one choose the most comfortable design. Master age riders will need to compromise between aerodynamic speed efficiency and rider comfort, and I recommend always to compromise on the side of comfort, without which the new bicycle will not be often ridden. 

A prominent bike design program used by many custom builders when fabricating an order offers the builder and customer many standard measuring references. Depending on the bicycle design the rider stack and reach cockpit measurement is a serious comfort determinant. Following is the link to BikeCad's glossary of measurements custom builders use. Glossary terms are hot-linked and when clicked will offer a graphic of each term, stack, front center, fork offset, Q-factor, and so forth.

Bicycle design has remained quite similar for a hundred years, one reason being inexpensive limited fabrication material. There have been exceptions though. One French constructor in the thirties made an aluminum fifteen pound bike for his country’s technical trials. One can imagine the cost of that machine using the “rare" metal. Today’s material technology, titanium, magnesium, aluminum, stainless steel, and carbon presents really unlimited and complex choices. Material choice changes design formula like head and seat angle, fork rake, but the basic diamond shape remains the same, as does wheel design. I’ve seen club rider rim and tire size change from wide 27c down to 19c and now back to wider efficient and thankfully more comfortable sizes. Developing tubeless technology is again providing wider rims and higher TIP (thread per inch) tires. Before purchasing a new set of wheels it would be a good idea to research those new wider 24c rim size wheels.

River Trail Connections (Feb. 4 & 11), Rail Trail (Feb. 13), Rail Trail closure

From: Tim Rogers <timro@hotmail.com>
Date: February 4, 2014 12:46:34 PM MST
To: Tim Rogers <timro@hotmail.com>
Subject: River Trail Connections (Feb. 4 & 11), Rail Trail (Feb. 13), Rail Trail closure

Hello Community Cruisers: Hard to believe, but many of the possible trail improvements that we have looked at on our rides are finally coming into fruition.  Please see attached, and below, information on upcoming River Trail and Rail Trail meetings, as well as notice of Rail Trail work zone closures underway under I-25.
 
Hope you can make it to the meeting(s) of most interest to you, and please stay tuned for upcoming information on Dale Ball Day (March 7) as well as Bike Month events (Bike to Work, etc.) coming up in May - - - including of course another Community Cruise of some sort.   Thanks and regards, Tim

1. TWO Open Houses to Discuss Santa Fe River Trail Connections and Improvements
 
TONIGHT, Feb. 4th, 5:30-7:00 at Frenchy's Barn, & Feb. 11, 5:30-7:00 at Santa Fe Community Convention Center.
Details in jpg file below.  (as of noon today, it is still ON!)

 

 2.  Santa Fe Rail Trail Connection - Public Involvement Meeting Invitation

 

The City of Santa Fe is working on connecting the existing Rail Trail from Alta Vista, to Pen Road and the Cerrillos / St. Francis intersection. You are invited to participate in a public meeting to review project progress and provide input. Representatives from the City of Santa Fe and the project team will be available to answer questions and collect your feedback. 
  
When: Thursday, February 13, 20145:30-6:30 p.m.

Where: Whole Foods Community Room
1090 S. St. Francis Dr. Santa Fe, NM
  
Details in attached pdf.  For further information contact Leroy Pacheco at the City of Santa Fe: lnpacheco@ci.santa-fe.nm.us

 

3.  Santa Fe Rail Trail Retaining Wall & Slope Stabilization Construction Begins Monday, February 3, 2014

Work to construct a retaining wall and provide slope stabilization along the Santa Fe Rail Trail between the I-25 overpass and Rabbit Road is scheduled to begin on Monday, February 3, weather permitting.


Construction crews will place a concrete retaining wall to prevent soil from washing onto trail. The adjacent steep slopes will also be seeded to minimize soil erosion during storm events.


This section of the Rail Trail will be closed from 8:30am to 5:00pm on weekdays while work is performed. Trail users are asked to seek alternate routes during work hours, but will be able to access the trail during non-working hours and weekends.


Work is scheduled for completion in April, weather permitting.


For more information contact James Martinez, City of Santa Fe Public Works Department, (505) 955-6953.

Thursday Winter Rides new start place, Feb - March

Thursday Winter rides in February and March will now start from Museum Hill parking
lot.  Same place we ride from during the summer.  Off Camino Lejo near the
Botanical Gardens.  Start time 11AM.

Also check out the Ad Hoc Rides Blog here:  http://www.sobrideblog.cosinecs.com

Acequia Trail Bridges (tonight), River Trail Connections (Feb. 4 & 11)

From: Tim Rogers <timro@hotmail.com>
Date: January 23, 2014 8:02:28 AM MST
To: Tim Rogers <timro@hotmail.com>
Subject: 2nd try: Acequia Trail Bridges (tonight), River Trail Connections (Feb. 4 & 11)

Greetings Community Cruisers: Please consider coming to the following public meetings on critical trail connections that we have looked at on our rides.  More info. below...It's happening!!!

Santa Fe Acequia Trail Improvements - Neighborhood Meeting

When: Thursday, January 23, 20145:30-6:30 p.m.

Where: BF Young Professional Bldg., Sierra Vista Room
1300 Camino Sierra Vista. Santa Fe, NM


Join us for an informational open house to discuss connections between the Santa Fe Acequia Trail and the Kathryn Ave. and Oñate St. neighborhoods. The project team and City of Santa Fe representatives will be on hand to answer questions and collect your feedback.

For further information contact design office at: chorn@do-designoffice.com
  

2013 SOB Tour from Trinidad CO.

George Gamble has provide this link to a slideshow of the 2013 SOB Tour from Trinidad CO.
to Santa Fe.


enjoy,
Ian

Unscheduled rides

Unscheduled rides 


Tuesdays rides in meet DeVargas Mall parking lot (near Office Depot) at 11 AM till further notice.

Thursday rides meet at  Eldorado Agora Car Park at 11AM till further notice.


There is also an Unscheduled Rides Blog where any member can post a ride they are doing seeking others to ride.

To access that site click here

Info also available on the website at:  http://santafesobs.com/Notices_and_Useful_links.html


Ian

*Across the Country in a Week** from Wall St Journal

Wall Street Journal, January 14, 2014
*Across the Country in a Week**
A team of cyclists in their 70s rewrite rules about age and exercise*

By Robbie Shell

Interesting and informative article which can be viewed at this link:




Upcoming Meetings on Biking and Walking in Santa Fe

From: Tim Rogers <timro@hotmail.com>
Date: January 13, 2014 10:46:28 AM MST

Subject: Upcoming Meetings on Biking and Walking in Santa Fe

Hello Community Cruise List: Two important city meetings coming up soon (Items #1 and #2 below).  Make your voice heard!  Also this coming Wed., I will be participating in a bilingual discussion of walking on the South Side (#3 below).  If that's of interest to you, I hope you can make it.
 
FYI I will be making this May's community cruise plans soon, your input welcome.  

Thanks, Tim
 
1. Santa Fe River Trail Crossing - Public Input Meeting (Thurs., Jan. 16)

When: Thursday, January 16, 2014; 5:00-6:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m. - brief presentation

Where: Gonzales Community School Library
851 West Alameda St. Santa Fe, NM
 
"Join us for the Santa Fe River Trail Crossing informational open house, to discuss improvements to the pedestrian and bicycle crossing at the St. Francis Drive / West Alameda Street intersection.

Representatives from the City of Santa Fe and the project team will be available to answer questions and collect your feedback. For further information contact Brian Drypolcher at the City of Santa Fe: bkdrypolcher@ci.santa-fe.nm.us "

2. Bridges to Acequia Trail - Neighborhood Meeting (Thurs., Jan. 23)
 
"You are invited to participate in a neighborhood meeting to discuss implementing connections from the Santa Fe Acequia Trail across the Acequia Madre to the neighborhoods at Kathryn Ave. and Oñate St.

Representatives from the City of Santa Fe and the project team will be available to answer questions and collect your feedback. 

When: Thursday, January 23, 2014; 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Where: BF Young Professional Bldg., Sierra Vista Room
1300 Camino Sierra Vista. Santa Fe, NM
  
For further information contact design office at: chorn@do-designoffice.com   "
 
3. COMMUNITY MEETING: WALKING IN YOUR COMMUNITY
JANUARY 15, 2014 @ 5:15PM-6:15PM
Country Club Gardens MHP Clubhouse, 6151 Airport Rd.  Santa Fe, NM 87507

La Familia Medical Center REACH community health workers and
Guest speakers: Maria Perez from Chainbreaker Collective & Tim Rogers, Transportation Specialist 
(This meeting will be in Spanish and English)
 
La Familia Medical Center REACH program
2145 Caja Del Oro Grant Rd. Santa Fe, NM 87507. (505) 438 3195 Ext 1652  https://www.facebook.com/LaFamiliaMedicalCenter 
http://www.lafamiliasf.org/

Potential traffic disruptions in the Lamy area

Road Cyclists Alert!
 
Two popular road biking routes between Santa Fe and the Lamy and Galisteo areas, HWY 285 S and CR 33, are under threat by a crude oil terminal being planned for the Lamy rail yard. Pacer Energy Marketing, LLC, based in Tulsa, OK, in conjunction with the Santa Fe Southern Railway, is planning to bring 25 to 50 tank truck loads a week of crude oil from NW New Mexico down the HWY 285 S corridor and into Lamy. The crude oil will be loaded on railroad tank cars and shipped south by BNSF. The empty tank trucks will then make the return trip to NW New Mexico following the same routes. The total impact; 50 to 100 trucks weekly on this popular road bike segment. HWY 285 S is also a leg on the annual Santa Fe Century ride.
 
Please read and distribute the attached fact sheet, lodge your concerns with the contacts on the back of the sheet, and post your comments on our Facebook page. A community-wide meeting is scheduled for January 18, 2014. Details are attached.
 
Yours for safe cycling,
The No Crude in Lamy Steering Committee


SOB Bike trip - September 2nd to 7th - Durango Loop

Hi Everyone, 

It is not too early to start planning our SOB Bike trip for next September.  
The date would be Sept 2nd to the 7th.  
I floated the idea of the Durango Loop for our ride at our Holiday party.  It would be a bit longer than our other trips, but there are always options.  This area of Colorado is spectacular. I have done this ride and the scenery is in a class by itself.  The loop is about 230 miles and there is a fair amount of climbing.  But, we will have sag support, so you can always ride in the car or you may have to take turns driving.  The ride is done every year by some people who do it in 24 hours, and it is called the Death Ride.  HOWEVER, we would do it in 5 days with reasonable mileage.  Everyday, except one, the mileage would be less than 50 miles and a couple of days would be less than 40 miles.  One day, from Telluride to Dolores or Mancos would be close to 70 miles, but most of it is downhill.  I need to know who might be interested.  If you are, please email me ASAP:       j.costlow@gmail.com    Or, if you have suggestions for another ride, please let me know.  I really need to start planning soon.  Also, if anyone would like to help, I would like that.  Ian, has begun to plot out the route and mileage.  We will send it out as soon as I hear of your interest.  

Judy

Rail Trail Status from Steve G.

The next Segment Rail Trail project will be going out for bid in the next month or so. The design engineers will swing the route underneath trestles twice from the east side to the west side adding swell ambience to this scenic trail. This contract will include Segments 2 and 3 for a total of 4 miles.

Segment 1  Rabbit Road to SpurTrail 1.7 miles
Segment 2 Spur Trail to Nine Mile Road 2.1 miles
Segment 3 Nine Mile to Vista Grande 1.9 miles
Segment 4 Vista Grande to El Dorado 1.7 miles
Segment 5 Spur Ranch Road to New Moon Overlook 3.35 miles
Total of 10.75 miles

Trail bed width eight feet.
Two trail crossings from west side of tracks to east side and back again, I think, under the trestles or bridges at 9.4 miles and 7.1 miles and they will be engineered to withstand our gully washers. The path will be designed with run-off knicks (flat areas away from the trail for pooling, rather than have the pooling water rest on the trail), grade reversals or swales (short backward gradients to promote water sheeting across the trail rather than down the trail, rolling grade dips (short rises with a built-in side outlet directing water into knicks). Culverts will be directed into gabions (riprap rocks some in baskets), and the trail bed under the trestles will be some sort of puncheon design (bridges). Very cool.

In the meantime Santa Fe County Carol, Albert, Terry, and Seniors Ken, and I are repairing ridiculous sections here and there to keep the trail non-technical and enjoyable.






SOB Info Notes - Dec. 16, 2013


Dec. 20th is the Annual SOB Holiday Party for members only.  You need to RSVP Judy Costlow at:  j.costlow@gmail.com    Last year we were short on main dishes so please consider bringing one this year.  Meet at the El Castillo Lifecare Community Room, 250 E. Alameda Street, 6:00-9:00pm. You can park in the NM School for the Arts across the street on the corner of Paseo de Peralta and Alameda.

The membership drive for 2014 has started. We have one member that sent me a $10 check, 2105 Paseo Ponderosa, Santa Fe 87501,  I’ll have a table with your new membership cards at the Annual SOB Holiday Party on Dec. 20th.

There is a new feature on the SOB web site called SOB Ad Hoc Rides. The purpose is to record any ride. Check it out at:  www.sobrideblog.cosinecs.com  Thanks to Bob Bogart for this excellent idea. You need to sign up, which is a very simple process. 

There are some changes to the cycling classes scheduled in March.  I had to make a decision between the two offerings because REI is charging a fee to use their Community Room now. They allowed me to use the room at no cost for the Thursday classes. So the Advanced Cycling Techniques classes are canceled.  The Traffic Skills 101 classes are scheduled for March 13, 20, and 27. 

On Feb. 20 the Ride Leaders will have the annual ride planning meeting. Judy is talking to Whole Foods about using their Community Room.  She will let you know when later.

Lynn Packard the SOB Bike Advocate along with Tim Rogers, a community advocate working with the MPO and Santa Fe County passed road standards that are beneficial to all cyclists. Lynn has the details which I do not want to include here.

The Tuesday and Thursday rides are starting at 11:00 am.

Edwin.

wd40 to the rescue - from Steve G.

Morning,

Continuing to repair Rail/Lamy Trail here and there until the recent snows.

Tried pedaling the trail couple days ago and fell on my butt. Guess I'll have to wait until the sun does its job, dagnabit. I did pedal into work on the pave yesterday in a light snow. Cyclocross bikes are great, what a wonderful trip. Reminded me of moonlight cross country skiing in Alaska.

Completed a fun project couple days ago. Completely wore out a brand new 12 point hack saw blade removing the tine and an inch off the blade of my heavy pick. I constructed a lighter adze hoe. According to a forest service manual they are more efficient than a Pulaski. Looking for a used steel mountain bike frame in the usual places. I've been working on a project how to transport by bike two or three full length repair tools i.e. shovel, rake, and my new adze hoe May have a solution using my stout chromolly rear rack. 

Here's one for the books. This morning after sharpening and oiling my trail working tools, they were shamefully dull, I trimmed some unruly branches along the driveway. Protecting the tree cuts with a heavy black pruning spray I managed to splatter little black drops on my face, eyebrows, lips, ears, and that stuff does not wash off with vigorous scrubbing. Oh nooooooo. Paint remover on skin is not a healthy option, but I did remember WD40, along with many nasty hydrocarbon elements does have fish oil as one ingredient, soooooo. Using my chain cleaning toothbrush I carefully scrubbed and viola, removed the pruning paint drops, quickly followed by copious amounts of warm soapy water, followed with liberal amounts of Melody's best skin cream. 65 years old and I still manage to do dumb and sometimes dumber. Ah, just like my mother… and now wife, "What were you thinking ?!" 

Merry Christmas,
Stevo




Discussion on efficient crank length, from Steve G

Happy Holidays,

As we prepare for the new cycling year discussion on efficient crank length has again popped up. As a reminder for out old guard and for our newer club members, a revisit on best crank length.

at 4'11" her 170mm cranks seem too long. At 5'8" I find 170's comfortable. math revealed 77cm inseam to 170 crank length ratio suggest her 63 cm inseam would be comfortable on 149 mm crank arms. Any thoughts?

There are several leg to crank length ratio formulas on the web. Zinn, for example, but make sure you verify on his web page, uses a range from 20.5-21.5 per cent of the leg length to calculate his recommended crank length. After 60 years in the saddle my recommendations: A. yes, shorter cranks benefit shorter legs, men and women. B. shorter cranks benefit those who do not have primo developed muscle mass such as avid cyclists. C. shorter cranks benefit master age riders, because of B. D. shorter cranks benefit those with knee, and hip joint problems. Lots of physiological studies support benefit of shorter cranks. But how short is short? 

I have 29 inch inseam length. Through my thirties I could torque 175 mm cranks in time trials with my "Popeye" legs. In my forties 170 mm cranks eliminated some beginning knee issues. In my fifties and now sixties 165 mm cranks allow fifty plus mile rides at speed without knee issues. My cyclocross and tandem bikes currently have 170 mm cranks, but if I were to compete I would definitely purchase 165 mm. My wife has a 30 inch inseam, and happily rides 165 mm stoker cranks. 

When I was active in master age racing a couple long legged compatriots, 31 inch inseam, had knee issues. They switched to 170 mm and 165 mm cranks and competed successfully without knee issues.

The best cycling book I recommend to all avid cyclists, neophytes and master age riders who want to keep pedaling forever, is $12 at Amazon, authors Andy Pruitt and Fred Matheny. Andy Pruitt's Complete Medical Guide for Cyclists. From their chapter on knees, "…cadence of 90 RPM, 5,400 revolutions per hour, 1.5 million pedal strokes in a 5,000 mile year."  Bike fit chapters include info on position of saddles, handle bars, and break levers. Section 2 discusses knee, back, neck, foot, ankle, hand, shoulder, crotch. Section 3, recovery, health maintenance, aging, comfort and performance, biomechanics, and stretching.  

To "Coach Fred" entitled "Do Long Crank-arms Help Time Trialing?"

Question: I'm a 36 and a competitive triathlete, usually placing top-5 in my age group. I use 170 mm crank arms but have heard that for time trials, longer is better. Is that true? 

Coach Fred Matheny Replies: Studies of crank length aren't consistent. Some show that longer cranks provide greater leverage for turning big gears. Some show that shorter cranks foster greater speed via a faster cadence. And some show that crank length is completely individual. Longer cranks aren't a panacea for time trialing. In fact, there are dangers associated with them. The added length makes your knees bend more at the top of pedal strokes and extend more at the bottom -- both of which can lead to biomechanical injuries if you jump from 170 mm to, say, 180 mm. Longer cranks reduce cadence and a brisk cadence is the key to good time trials. Many time trialists use crank-arms 2.5 mm longer than those on their normal road bike. Because 2.5 mm (one-tenth of an inch) isn't much, it rarely causes an injury. The jury is still out on whether that bit of extra length actually improves performance.

Appropriate crank length is steeped in mystique and considered part of the "art" of coaching for the competitive cyclists. Knee pain, especially chondromalacia, is often an indicator that crank length is incorrect.

Some competitive cyclists use shorter cranks to reduce the dead spot at the top of the cycle, from 9 to 12 o'clock and to allow a shorter stroke through the strongest leg movement.

An increase in crank length leads to an increase in the lever arm allowing for more force. Longer cranks have been touted as superior for hard steady efforts such as hill climbing and mountain biking. But studies have shown that while they change torque, power is unchanged and they require the rider to pedal a larger circle.

Competitive cyclists ride comparatively smaller gears on the track in sprinting events as opposed to the road to allow optimal cadence in the shortest time. This facilitates reaching optimal cadence in the shortest time accelerating out of the bends. The same effect occurs with shorter cranks. The use of longer cranks allows for more leverage and so more power but can lead to a dead spot at the top of the stroke for those with a less than perfect pedal action & strength . In endurance events where the requirement for high cadence is not as great, the extra leverage is of benefit. If you feel more comfortable turning big gears at lower cadences, you'll like your cranks a little longer. But if you prefer to spin at a higher cadence go with shorter cranks. If you change your crank length on your current set up, don't forget to adjust your seat height as changing length will change the distance from your seat to the lowest point of the pedal cycle.

Suggested crank lengths based on traditional wisdom - start here and then tailor them up or down to your own style and preferences:

Frame Size   Crank   Inseam   Crank
54 cm or less 170 mm
80 cm or less  170 mm
55 - 58 cm 172.5 mm
81 - 86 cm  172.5 mm
59 cm or greater 175 mm
87 cm or above  175 mm

From another source referencing your inseam in inches:
inseam 29 inches - 165 mm crank
inseam 29 - 32 inches - 170 mm crank
inseam 32 - 34 inches - 172.5 mm crank
inseam 34 inches - 175 mm crank

Track riders generally choose crankarms up to 5 mm shorter and mountain bikers up to 5 mm longer than the above recommendations.

Forgive a 75-yo lurker, but my memory of discussions about crank length, was that the important measurements were not height or inseam, but the combination of thigh length and foot length.  It would seem logical that these two measurement constitute most of the lever that turns the crank; not the length of the leg as a whole.

Hello Michael,

Yes, you have a point. Human physiology is unique in that our proportions are all over the place, long femurs, short upper body, long upper body, short legs, ad infinitum. That is why general ratio formulas are inexact. Physical Anthropologists have been wrestling with these measurements for a hundred years trying to find a "unified theory of everything" so to speak. Statistical analysis within each formula allow for adjustment ratio errors up to a point. Successful athletic trainers start with their preferred theories as a baseline and adjust to the individual's specific physiology,  endomorph, ectomorph, mesomorph, their anthropometrics or somatotype. 

Eddy Merckx for example has proportionally long femurs, thigh length, which is a pedaling advantage, combined with other proportionally advantageous heart volume stroke, and seven liter lung capacity. Muscle physiology studies support the better efficiency of muscle recovery at higher cadence lower gears over lower cadence higher gears, other physiology considerations equal. The last ten years of prevailing bio-mechanics research does not address foot length per se, but definitely femur length and somatotype, along with metabolism, respiratory, and pulmonary data.

When considering most efficient crank length, without extensive and expensive testing, non-professional cyclists must rely on general theories and common sense combined with resulting immune, joint, and metabolism stress of their physiology after high intensity competition or endurance events. Re the crank issue when asked, one key component I ask avid cyclists to try to understand is the physiology of muscle mass to bone density. Large muscle mass stimulates supporting structures of dense bone and connective tissue, tendons and ligaments. Use it or loose it. With less muscle mass, there is coinciding less stimulus for supporting structure, bone, ditto connective tissue; ergo, turning big circles, longer cranks, may detrimentally over stress the fulcrum points like the knee. We used to call it "Spring Knee Syndrome." So, for those of us who do not or no longer compete, but love to pedal endlessly from one adventure to another, my advice is to seriously consider the advantages of shorter cranks for two primary reasons, less muscular-skeletal stress, and higher or faster muscle recovery efficiency when pedaling.

I used to track these bio-mechanics and physiology studies in sport physiology and exercise journals, and aging clinic reports, Australia, Great Britain, Mayo Clinic to mention a few. Lots of Internet accessibility if one is interested.

Judy Costlow slide show. Travel Bug Nov 30th 5pm.

Judy Costlow will be giving a slide show at the Travel Bug on Saturday, Nov 30th from 5 to 6 pm.  Come early if you want a seat.  It is on her bike trip to SW Ireland this last May.

Ireland is wild, rain soaked, and beautiful. I had taken a previous trip to Ireland and it met all its expectations, raining most every day with howling, blusterly winds and bone-chilling cold. I wanted to go back and experience it on a bicycle! May 2013 was the first anniversary of my husband 's death and it was good to be away from Santa Fe. I went with Adventure Bicycle Club (BAC) and we explored the Southwest corner of Ireland. We started in Killarney, riding the Ring of Kerry, the Dingle Pennisula and all the roads in between. The scenery met all my expectations, and the people were charming and friendly. In twleve days of cycling it rained only three of those days. It was a ride to be remembered!

SOB ad hoc ride site


We have created a site, link here: http://www.sobrideblog.cosinecs.com, which allows SOB’s and potentially others, to post a ride / event that they plan to do and see if others would like to join.
There are 3 main purposes to the site. 
1.       Posting an ad hoc ride, e.g. one not on the normal SOB Tuesday / Thursday calendar which you are looking for other riders to join.

2.       For normal SOB Tuesday / Thursday rides when the weather is threatening (rain, snow, ice, wind) you can post the event and see if anyone else is planning to attend.  This will only work if most folks check on the ride prior to the event.

3.       Posting a non-bike event, e.g. hike, snow shoe or XC ski that you would like to have more people join.

All communication is via email.  When a new event is posted you will get an email, once a day, to inform you that a new event was posted and that will allow you to log into the site if you are interested and “attend” the event.

Note that when you initially go the site you will have to create an account, instructions are on the front page of the site. 

If you have any questions, email    bob.bogart.x1@gmail.com

Enjoy.

Tentative trail repair Saturday 23rd, from Steve G.

Tentative trail repair Saturday 23rd, morning 9-12. Big tools, park at dirt lot on Ave Vista Grande and Rail Trail, walk south half mile. Tentative, because a snow storm is moving in that day. May be ok for some cross training exercise, may not.

As we did quite successfully before in order to save flora and minimize future erosion we use the "Burma Road" engineering plan. Collapse gully edges into the trench which becomes the new trail bed. These deep washouts are rare and the result of no maintenance for two or three years. The new trail bed will allow for small erosion gullies after storms; however, they are easily corrected with minimal repair sometimes ten or fifteen minutes. The current trail you see is a minuscule eight inches on a slippery steep camber dropping into the deep trench. Ken is actually standing on my shoulders




Gearing & Chainrings, New Gear - from Steve G

For years I've thought nine, ten, and now eleven cog/gear clusters were redundant for master age riders. Predominately I use only three or four gears, and even when I was racing, perhaps five or six gears worked well. On my daily Rail/Lamy Trail commute at speed or during a relaxing jaunt I typically use only the two upper cassette cogs and my 34 chainring. More about the gear ratio below. 

Because many avid mountain bike or dirt riders have been fiddling with drive trains removing one or two unnecessary chainrings, in the last couple years both Sram and Shimano have started developing drive trains with two chain rings, instead of the traditional three. And last year Sram provided their one chain ring prototype XX1 design to several professional enduro, downhill, and cross professionals. Skeptical at first the pros refused to race without a chain keeper or chain guard attached to the frame in place of the front derailleur. "No way the chain will stay on the single front ring without a keeper." After a few events they were convinced the new technology design did indeed keep the chain from falling off in the worst technical conditions. Shimano is still testing their one ring design. Sram's design includes a couple things that keeps their chain on the single front ring. The chain ring teeth are a bit longer, my measurements showed only one or two millimeters, which doesn't seem would make much of a "keep it attached to the chainring" difference, the teeth are alternatively profiled wide and narrow to match the outer and inner chain plates, and the alternate wide chainring teeth are designed with a little bulb or hook shape at their ends.

Other design factors include a more rigorous long arm derailleur with a clutch component, a narrower chain that uses a new hardening coating for strength and longevity, and an eleven cog/gear cassette. "Oh poo" I said, "eleven gears." But, I was so taken with the one chainring technology, easier to maintain, clean, elimination of one derailleur for simpler gearing and adjustments, I decided to jump into my research mode. The complete group includes crank, chainring, chain, rear derailleur, trigger or twist shifter, and best price I seen to date is $1,100, you choose the chainring size, 30 to 38 teeth and either of the two shift mechanisms. Cranks come in either 170mm or 175mm lengths, and either GXP or BB30 bottom brackets. The crank spindle design uses spacers, which allows the crank to work with either of the two standard 68mm or 73mm BB designs. Pretty clever. There is another expense gotcha if you have not replaced your rear wheel in the last year or so. The amazing humongous cassette is eleven speed and must be mounted on an eleven speed hub body that will work with the wee bitty little Sram cog.

Gear ratio. How could a single chainring offer enough usable gears? The cassette has this wee bitty ten tooth cog on one end and a forty-two tooth cog on the other end! That is bigger than my cross/compact chainring. A 34 tooth chain ring gear ratio is 93 inches to 22 bail out inches for crazy serious climbing. 30 tooth ring gears are 82-19 inches, 38 tooth ring, 104-25 inches. Holy smoke. 

Research told me the eleven speed X01 crank will work with a current ten speed chain and cassette. With the removal of a spacer newer technology ten-speed rear wheels will accept eleven speed technology; however, remember at this time the Sram eleven speed cassette body must be used, because of the itty bitty little cog. I purchased only a BB30 X01 crank, a 34 tooth ring, mounted it with appropriate spacers on my 68mm BB and have given it a run for the money on repaired, un-repaired Rail Trail, and pavement commuting for the last couple weeks. Notice in the photo below, no front derailleur, but I have not yet removed the internally routed front derailleur cable… just in case The single chainring works like a champ never dropping the chain even when I missed an un-repaired trail turn and went bouncing into the wilderness. My current literally ten-speed set up with a 12-27 cassette provides me with a 77-34 inch ratio, plenty good enough speed for this fellow. My Christmas list may just include a couple more X01 parts.



Rail Trail update from Steve G.

Rail Trail work is finally done… for now. It can always use finesse work, out cropping pointy rocks, an old slippery root, and so forth, but the dangerous ruts and erosion ditches are repaired on the mid-section from parking lot to Vista Grande. 

This next week I'm doing an exploratory ride on the trail east side of tracks. Once stage three work begins on west side Rail Trail I expect the west trail will be closed. Couple weeks ago I rode the little used east route for a couple miles. It was more or less rideable except for the gullies. Couple badly eroded arroyos, rideable if one is careful not to fall into the ditches

In case you may be interested in some fresh air next Saturday morning.

http://www.santafecountynm.gov/userfiles/file/AHOStrailmap.pdf

http://www.santafecountynm.gov/public_works/open_space_and_trails_program/arroyo_hondo_open_space

Steve

I have a volunteer event at the Arroyo Hondo Trails scheduled for Saturday November 9th from 9:00a.m.-noon if you are available, I‘d love you to join us. We have 3 different projects to choose from on that day.  I want to  introduce you to the members of The Trails Alliance of Santa Fe.
 
Call me anytime.
 
My Best,
 
Carol J. Branch
Volunteer Coordinator
Santa Fe County
992-3053 469-0220 cell
cbranch@santafecountynm.gov

SOB Info Notes for Oct. 25, 2013

This is just a final recap of the Awards Luncheon for those that did not attend.

All 50 slots were taken so had a packed house.  The weather was so nice that you could sit outside if you wanted.

The Board met at 10:30 with two members absent.  George Gamble and Fred Nugent met SOBs as they arrived and explained the ice breaker activity.  Basically each person was given a list of the club members with a blank after it to fill in their bikes manufacturer. Prizes were provided by our sponsors.  Bike n Sport gave ten $10 gift certificates, Rob & Charlies gave 10 cycling socks, and Spin Doc gave 12 water bottles. The grand winner with 48 matches was Karen Roth.  There were eleven with 30 or more matches.  It was a lot of fun!

Karin and Dick Roth did a wonderful job with the food and organizing the facility.  A very special shout out to Liz Simon and Devon Dalzell for providing and serving the deserts. This was a very generous contribution both monetarily and time wise.  Also to all the nameless people that volunteered to help out with other deserts, food prep, setting up the room, and breaking it down, thank you so much.

The program was divided into parts, business meeting followed by awards presentations. At the business meeting it was decided to have informal rides through the winter months. For the months of Oct., Nov., and Dec the starting point will be the 599 Rail Runner station parking area, The starting time is 10:00 for Oct. and Nov. In Dec. Jan. and Feb. the start time will be 11:00 am.  In the month of January the start place will be in Eldorado at the Agora Center parking area. In Feb. and March the starting point will be Museum Hill parking area.

There will be a Ride Leader planning meeting on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2014.  The location to be announced at a later date. Some of the pressing issues caused by our clubs growing pains will be addressed.

The board members for 2014 will be Judy Costlow, Edwin Crosswhite, Ian Norrish, Clare Rhoades, Steve Gitomer, Gary Katz, and Lynn Pickard.  If you are interested in serving on the Board contact Edwin at ecrosswhite@cybermesa.com.

There will be two different classes taught by Edwin Crosswhite LCI #221 in March. The Traffic Skills 101 course and an Advanced Cycling Techniques class are scheduled for the last three weeks in March.

The high point of the awards given was to Ramon Montoya for becoming an Elite 80.  Also Gary Tausan and Edwin Crosswhite for “Perfect Attendance”.

Lamy/Rail Trail from Steve G.

Morning Trail Riders,


For the past couple months I've been riding the Trail daily to and from my temporary work in town, and I have really enjoyed the daily commute away from traffic. Lots of friendly walkers with their pets, most on leashes, and I sometimes stop for a pleasant chat time permitting. Almost always I receive a thank you for the warning when I ring my small handle bar bell, which pulls the walkers out of their outdoor reverie comfortably rather than shocking or surprising them. Although yesterday afternoon I did have to almost stop at a corner before an older gentleman noticed me. He apologized profusely for not paying attention explaining he was lost in meditation while walking. These episodes have happened with other people occasionally and I always set their minds at rest telling them I am happy they are enjoying themselves, our beautiful area, the quiet sunset, evening, et cetera. Recently a lady was sitting by herself on the side of the trail on a rise. When I stopped to ask if she was ok she explained that she was just enjoying the view, and by the way, thank you for stopping and asking. No one else had ever stopped before. I looked around from her resting spot and agreed the view was nice. Perfect opportunity for short friendly meetings with strangers. 

One high school uses the trail for their cross country training two or three times a week and I always enjoy threading my way past fifteen or twenty young runners and their coaches spread out all along the the stage one trail section, from the new parking lot on Rabbit to the Spur. 

Most days coming and going I do cross paths with a couple or more other cyclists, not always the young bucks. Earlier this week a young fellow zipped by me just past the parking lot and I decided to raise my heart a bit and chased. For the next several miles he on his fat tires would drop me and my cross tires on the gnarly down sections and sand pits at the bottom of each gully; however, as we master riders know, what goes down must come up, and I pulled him back on every climb. He finally asked if I wanted to pass and I told him no I was just having fun, to keep enjoying himself, and thanks for pulling me along.

This last week with the onset of shorter days I have mounted my serious bicycle head light as dusk comes earlier and the trail shadows are longer and deeper. There are more walkers out this time of the evening and almost no other riders. But I was surprised when two regular fellows without lights were heading to town after sunset. Deeper ruts have a way of flattening and hiding without proper light.

Our 100 year rains this fall have caused many formerly hard packed trail sections to break down or wash away leaving softer sand and of course wash out ruts. Fatter tires work much better on these sections. I occasionally repair worst areas to keep the ride non-technical for the most part. Sometimes I do walk the worst sand pits, or rutted gullies, but the upside is it helps me stop to enjoy the views, stretch the walking muscles, and ponder how to make the trail rideable again. Exercise is exercise I notify and coordinate with Carol Branch, our county trails and open space liaison, who is happy to hear comments and suggestions. Her e-mail is above in the CC box. We are lucky to have such a kindred spirit to help with trail maintenance.

Tomorrow, Sunday the 20th, I will be doing a couple hours of minor repair starting at the small dirt parking area El Dorado's Vista Grande Rd. and Rail Trail at 10 A.M. Tools: a big old 16 oz. carpenter's hammer with a straight claw and a gardener's trowel. A cat's paw also works if you wear good gloves; otherwise, blisters. Procedure: Slow pedal towards town stopping lots to chip away rut edges carving twelve to twenty-four inch run-up ramps for wheels to an angle of maybe thirty to forty-five degrees. I remove or work around particularly sharp rocks in the middle of the trail and maybe remove an odd dead root or two. Mark and I experimented on one bad section last time we repaired a steep off-camber next to a deep wash out rut. He carved down one side of the camber making it less steep at the same time filling in the rut with the debris. I worked another section up the gully doing the same thing only on the other gully side angle of repose. Over the next week I watched the bicycle tire tracks to see which repair was being used most. It takes a few rides to pack the soft dirt into the filled rut. Both repaired sides saw lots of use, but I would have to give the thumbs up to Mark's construction prowess.

The trail is beautiful this fall, and I've already enjoyed our first snow a couple weeks ago. Hope to see some of you out there.


Our newly married Chip on stage one serpentine.






 

SOB Info Notes for Oct. 15, 2013


The new starting time for SOB rides is 10:00 am.
 
The “End of Year Award Luncheon” is on Thursday, October 24, 2013.  Karin and Dick Roth are hosting this event in their Community Room at 2300 Alameda St. This is on the corner of Camino Carlos Real and Alameda St.  There is a board meeting at 10:30 and the luncheon starts at 11:30.  ONLY 15 places left so you need to contact Karin at karinroth@msn.com to reserve a place, right away.

Directions:
2300 West Alameda is at the intersection with Camino Carlos Rael. The address is on Alameda St. but the parking lot is off Camino Carlos Rael. You can also park on the street. Walk through the main entrance of the housing units to the central park area.  The Community Room is on the left side.

Karin needs help on Wed the 23rd to work in the kitchen with food preparations and on 
Thursday the 24th helping to  set up the room at 11:00 and after the event to cleanup.

The Castelli order is: 3 long sleeve jerseys, 3 short sleeve jerseys, and 4 shorts. Closing date is Oct. 18 (Friday). If the 10 unit requirement per category is not met then all moneys will be refunded.

Dec 20 (Friday) is the SOB Winter Pot Luck.  Judy Costlow is hosting this event and will be sending additional information later.

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